As pediatric respiratory illnesses rise, hospitals stretched thin

Children’s hospitals in Ohio don’t like what they see now. They told the media at a state-wide briefing by the Ohio Department of Health Monday about respiratory viruses that don’t normally surface until the winter season. They warned that the trend is very disturbing. We were told that resources at Akron Children’s Hospital were so limited that they could not afford to lose another nurse. According to their mother, they have not been sick at all in Washington Park this summer. But their family was aware of the unexpected respiratory viruses Children’s was trying to control, along with a spate of COVID-19 cases. “I’ve been following the news and you’re concerned about it,” said their mother, Kate Raterman of Western Hills. “That’s exactly why we’re going to have them wear masks at school,” she said, even though it was a requirement in their district. She said they would also be vaccinated once they become eligible. dr. Bruce Vanderhoff, Chief Medical Officer of the Ohio Department of Health, believes this could happen soon. “It will probably start with emergency use authorization and that will be followed after some time with the process resulting in full approval,” said Vanderhoff. It can’t come fast enough for those riding the vaccination train. They talked about overcrowded emergency waiting rooms at Children’s and treating respiratory viruses that they normally don’t encounter until the dead of winter. “My whole family gets it,” says Taylor Wood of Elmwood Place. “So my kids were sick, coughing and had sinuses.” She said her 4-year-old, Emir, was cooling off with his friend, 8-year-old Keegan. Wood, brought them to Washington Park from Elmwood Place because Emir was feeling better, even though she was still irritable and full of what she usually associates with December or January. “Not in August,” she said. “And so we panicked. We thought it was COVID.” They tested negative last Friday. Doctors beg the unvaccinated to do what Emir’s mother has yet to do. “I’m scared,” she said. vaccine has been developed too quickly. But she said she would probably get the chance now because “I don’t want to get COVID again.” She said it wasn’t fun. Most beds at Children’s are non-COVID, but the variant number is rising steeply. by dr. Patricia Manning-Courtney in an email Monday afternoon: “We have gone from low single digit to double digit hospitalizations in recent weeks. Overall the numbers are still low, but they have been steadily increasing. On the outpatient side we were in the beginning. until mid-summer as low as in the 1930s for positive outpatients per week, but in recent weeks we have jumped back to the triple digits.” The rate for teens is about 30% and as children return to school, admissions for mental health care rise in the fall along with respiratory diseases. very dangerous position regarding the care of the children of Ohio,” said Manning-Courtney. They want masks on faces and vaccines in guns. “We don’t need pizza or dinners. Or to be called heroes. And we certainly don’t need to be called zeros. We need you to help us by getting you vaccinated,” Manning-Courtney said.

Children’s hospitals in Ohio don’t like what they see now.

They told the media at a state-wide briefing by the Ohio Department of Health Monday about respiratory viruses that don’t normally surface until the winter season. They warned that the trend is very disturbing.

We were told that resources at Akron Children’s Hospital were so limited that they could not afford to lose another nurse.

We saw the Raterman guys—Lincoln, Archer, and Max—romp through the spray area in Washington Park on Monday afternoon.

According to their mother, they have not been sick at all this summer.

But their family was aware of the unexpected respiratory viruses Children’s was trying to control, along with a spate of COVID-19 cases.

“We’ve been following the news and you’re worried about it,” said their mother, Kate Raterman of Western Hills.

“That’s exactly why we’re going to make them wear masks at school,” she said, although it’s not a requirement in their district.

She said they would also be vaccinated once they become eligible.

dr. Bruce Vanderhoff, Chief Medical Officer of the Ohio Department of Health, believes this could happen soon.

“It will likely start with emergency use authorization and that will be followed over time with the process resulting in full approval,” said Vanderhoff.

It can’t come fast enough for those driving the vaccination train.

They talked about overcrowded emergency waiting rooms at Children’s and treating respiratory viruses that they normally don’t encounter until the dead of winter.

“My whole family gets it,” says Taylor Wood of Elmwood Place. “So my kids were sick, coughing, sinusy.”

She said her 4-year-old Emir was cooling off with his friend, 8-year-old Keegan.

Wood, brought them from Elmwood Place to Washington Park because Emir was feeling better, even though she was still irritable and constipated from what she usually associates with December or January.

“Not in August,” she said. “And so we panicked. We thought it was COVID.”

They tested negative last Friday.

Doctors beg the unvaccinated to do what Emir’s mother has yet to do.

“I’m scared,” she said.

She felt that the vaccine had been developed too quickly.

But she said she would probably get the shot now because “I don’t want to get COVID again.”

She said it wasn’t fun.

Most beds at Children’s are non-COVID, but the variant number is on the rise.

by dr. Patricia Manning-Courtney in an email Monday afternoon: “We’ve gone from low single digit to double digit hospitalizations in recent weeks. Overall, the numbers are still low, but they’ve been steadily rising. On the outpatient side, we were early to mid-range. of the summer as low as in the 1930s for positive outpatients per week, but we have jumped back to triple digits in recent weeks.”

The rate for teens is about 30% and as kids go back to school, mental health admissions rise in the fall along with respiratory illnesses.

“We’re sounding the alarm a little before then, because if we follow the trajectory of some of our southern neighbors, we could be in a very dangerous position regarding the care of Ohio’s children,” said Manning-Courtney. said.

They want masks on faces and vaccines in weapons.

“We don’t need pizza or dinners. Or be called heroes. And we certainly don’t need to be called zeros. We need you to help us by getting us vaccinated,” Manning-Courtney said.

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