MPFL reconstruction has similar outcomes in skeletally mature, immature pediatric patients

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Source:

Quinlan NJ, et al. MPFL Reconstruction in the Pediatric Population: Does Skeletal Maturity Affect Surgery Outcomes and Success? Presented at: American Orthopedic Society for Sports Medicine and Arthroscopy Association of North America Combined Meeting; July 7-11, 2021; Nashville, Tennessee.

disclosures:
Quinlan does not report any relevant financial disclosures.

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NASHVILLE, Tennessee – According to a presenter, reconstruction of medial patellofemoral ligaments yielded positive and comparable results in skeletally mature and skeletally mature pediatric patients with patellar instability.

“The problem in skeletally immature patients is that: [Schottle’s point] is close to the distal femoral physis, so several techniques have been described to minimize damage to the body,” Noah J. Quinlan, MD, an orthopedic resident at the University of Utah School of Medicine, said during his presentation at the American Orthopedic Society for Sports Medicine and Arthroscopy Association of North America Combined Meeting.

To determine the effect of skeletal maturity on medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) outcomes, Quinlan and colleagues performed a retrospective map review of data from 21 skeletally mature patients (mean age of 13 years) and 67 skeletally mature patients (mean age of 15 years) undergoing a underwent primary MPFL reconstruction with a minimum follow-up of 1 year.

Noah J. Quinlan

Primary outcome measures were IKDC scores, VAS pain scores, sports participation, sports avoidance, stiffness limiting activity, patient satisfaction, and revision.

At last follow-up, both skeletal mature and adult cohorts had mean IKDC scores of 79 and comparable VAS pain scores, satisfaction, and incidence of revision. Nine skeletally immature patients (43%) and 22 skeletally mature patients (32%) returned to sports participation, while five immature (24%) and 18 adult patients (27%) avoided sports because of the knee. Three skeletal immature patients (14%) and 14 skeletal mature patients (21%) reported activity-limiting stiffness.

“The skeletal immature group had a higher rate of subjectively reported subsequent knee injuries, but there was no real difference in the number of actual dislocations or the need for revision instability procedures,” Quinlan added.

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Annual Meeting of the American Orthopedic Society for Sports Medicine

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