New Mexico pediatrician seeing rise in sick children and kids

After more than a year of caring for children at home with limited exposure, a New Mexico pediatrician says their bodies are now being bombarded with viruses. Evan Anderson loves taking his daughter out for daddy-daughter days. “We love the biopark, the zoo, the botanical garden, the aquarium, everything outside,” Anderson said. But he noticed something. “We’ve been hit twice in the last two or three months, kind of suddenly, like it was catching up with us,” Anderson said. He says he and his daughter caught a cold after not having it for over two years. “A little runny nose and sore throat and a little cough, nothing we can’t handle,” said Anderson Jasmine French also says that all three of her children – aged 2, 4 and 6 – have recently become ill and says it will be a downside to getting back to normal hand, foot and mouth disease probably two weeks after they went back and then my oldest had a tomach bug,” said French. “It sucks. It’s a real shame because we actually stayed very healthy during the whole quarantine.” Dr. Alexandra Cvijanovich is a pediatrician with the Presbyterian Medical Group and says her clinic has seen a 20-30% increase in the number of sick children compared to March. “I see a lot of kids with colds and then colds with fevers. Even a high fever of 102-103,” Cvijanovich said. She has seen all normal childhood viruses make a comeback, but she specifically sees an increase in respiratory infections. “We’re even seeing respiratory syncytial virus also known as RSV, a virus that we usually see during the winter season,” Cvijanovich said. Just last month, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued a health advisory that Respiratory Syncytial Virus is spreading in southern states and can cause serious illness in young children and older adults. But why are we seeing all these viruses now? with any of these diseases. So babies who start daycare are basically starting from scratch because they’ve been sheltered in their family bubbles at home,” Cvijanovich said. She says it’s like the first day of kindergarten is now in the middle of summer. And it is also a problem for older children. “It’s the first time they’ve moved out of the house in about a year and a half and people are no longer wearing masks as per the mandate. People aren’t necessarily washing their hands as picky as they had been before,” Cvijanovich said. So what should parents do to keep their child healthy? She says to make sure children wash their hands, social distancing, and that those under 12 who are not yet vaccinated should wear their masks to try to protect them from COVID-19, as well as other viruses . this pandemic they have seen that when people keep themselves and their environment so clean, they see fewer sick people.

After more than a year of caring for children at home with limited exposure, a New Mexico pediatrician says their bodies are now being bombarded with viruses.

Evan Anderson loves taking his daughter out for daddy-daughter days.

“We love the biopark, the zoo, the botanical garden, the aquarium, anything that’s outside,” Anderson said.

But he noticed something.

“We’ve been hit twice in the last two or three months, like it was catching up with us,” Anderson said.

He says he and his daughter caught a cold after not getting one for over two years.

“A little bit of runny nose and sore throat and a little bit of coughing, nothing we can’t handle,” Anderson said.

And they are not alone.

Jasmine French also says that all three of her children – 2, 4 and 6 years old – have recently become ill and says going back to normal is a downside.

“They recently returned to day care and the youngest two probably got hand, foot and mouth disease probably two weeks after they went back and then my oldest had the stomach flu,” French said. “It sucks. It’s a real shame, because we actually stayed very healthy during the entire quarantine.”

dr. Alexandra Cvijanovich is a pediatrician with the Presbyterian Medical Group and says her clinic has seen a 20-30% increase in the number of sick children compared to March.

“I see many children with colds and then colds with fever. Even a high fever of 102-103,” said Cvijanovich.

She has seen all normal childhood viruses make a comeback, but she specifically sees an increase in respiratory infections.

“We’re even seeing respiratory syncytial virus also known as RSV, a virus that we usually see during the winter season,” Cvijanovich said.

Just last month, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued a health advisory that the Respiratory Syncytial Virus is spreading in southern states and can cause serious illness in young children and older adults.

But why are we seeing all these viruses now?

“One for the babies and toddlers who are now starting to leave their homes, these are the first exposures they are getting to any of these diseases. So babies starting daycare basically start from scratch because they’re sheltered at home in their family bubbles,” Cvijanovich said.

She says it’s like the first day of kindergarten is now in the middle of summer. And it is also a problem for older children.

“It’s the first time they’ve moved out of the house in about a year and a half and people don’t wear masks as per the mandate anymore. People don’t necessarily wash their hands as picky as they used to,” Cvijanovich said.

So what should parents do to keep their child healthy? She says to ensure children wash their hands, maintain social distancing, and that those under 12 who are not yet vaccinated should wear their masks to protect them from COVID-19, as well as other viruses.

Cvijanovich says they’ve seen through this pandemic that when people keep themselves and their environment so clean, they see fewer sick people.

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